Book Review|The Boys Who Challenged Hitler

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German forces occupied Denmark in 1940 with no government opposition due to lack of military force. A patriotic group of school boys, mostly 9th graders, decided to take things into their own hands. The Boys Who Challenged Hitler is their story, compiled from personal interviews and correspondence.

It took some time for the resistance in Denmark to become organized. In the meantime, the RAF Club and later The Church Hill Club, as the boys called themselves, took matters into their own hands. Recounting numerous acts of sabotage and resistance taken to undermine the Germans, Knud Peterson tells of the club’s function and operation. These activities against the Gestapo became widely known and helped inspire other Danes to join together to resist the Nazis.

The narration of events was absorbing. The risks and actions that the boys undertook demonstrate that even small subversion can make a large impact. These young men did what they felt they needed to do for their country.

I stumbled across this book on a list of recommended reading for young people but it is suitable for adult readers as well. This is a look at the sacrifice of these young men who lived through harsh times and risked their freedom to fight against the Nazi regime.

For those interested in WWII history, this book would be a great addition to any library of World War II accounts. There are extensive resources compiled in the back of this book. This high interest text could be used as part of a study of World War II.

There are many mature themes throughout the book. War, injury, acts of sabotage, illegal acts, imprisonment, deprivation, deception

Recommended for older children and adults.

Teacher’s Guide on the Author’s Website for The Boys Who Challenged Hitler

Author Interview The Boys Who Challenged Hitler | An Interview With Phillip Hoose School Library Journal

Knud Peterson passed away shortly after working with author Phillip Hoose on this manuscript. First hand accounts of history are very important. If you are interested in preserving history, The National World War II Museum in New Orleans has a website of interest, with guidelines for the oral history project here.

 

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2 comments

  1. Thanks for sharing. We just read and loved Boys of Wartime: Michael at the Invasion of France by Laurie Calkhoven. It seems to fit this same theme. The children played a critical role in resisting Hilter. (Of course, they sadly also played a role in bringing him to power.)

  2. i think my guys would love this book! They liked Snow Treasure by Marie McSwigan a couple years ago, so I’m going to check the library for this one. Thanks for sharing. Visiting form Literacy Musing Monday.

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